Positive Relationships Are The Key
To Business Success

by Craig Valine

In business it's easy to let building good relationships with those around you take a backseat to dealing with the daily aspects of running your business. But not taking care to nurture relationships with your customers, staff, suppliers, and others is one of the biggest mistakes you can make.

In business it's easy to burn bridges with people.

By "burning bridges" I mean, destroy relationships with your customers, clients, employees, vendors, etc.

It's one of the biggest mistakes I see businesses make. And quite frankly, it's a stupid mistake.

It's so stupid, I'm willing to admit I was the reigning champ of burning bridges with my clients and friends...and it cost me dearly.

There was a time in my life when:

  • I wouldn't return phone calls
  • I wouldn't follow-up with a referral from a client
  • I'd miss an appointment and not call to apologize
  • I wouldn't pay my vendors on time
  • I'd squabble over a few dollars, or
  • I'd act apathetic from a good deed from another

Isn't that stupid?

 

Of course it is. Unfortunately, I am NOT the only person who does this. Many of my own clients don't even realize how damaging it is to their own business, their reputations, and their credibility.

I am happy to say, however, that I've mended my ways.

The primary reason I got my act together was because a teacher of mine gave me a proverbial 'slap-in-the-face' and said, "your business is about relationships and you are destroying all of them."

I really took that to heart.



I now understand more than ever that it's critical to cultivate, maintain and nurture relationships with the people we do business with - not to burn bridges.

My business (marketing coaching) relies completely on my reputation, credibility, and rapport I build and keep with my clients. If I burn bridges with my clients, I burn a little bit of myself along the way.

Positive relationships are the key to success in business.

What if we've already burned bridges with the people we've done business with in the past? Is it too late to make peace?

Or, how do we prevent burning bridges with the people we're doing business with now?

Below are a few strategies that I use to prevent burning bridges and to nurture positive relationships with my clients:

  • Always treat your customers like dear and valued friends. Do the nice things for them that you'd do for your best friend or a family member. 

  • If your customer has a problem, rectify it as soon as possible. Communicate with them always. Let them know exactly how you intend to handle the problem, and when you'll be in contact with them next.

  • Always try to conduct yourself nobly and professionally in the end, as well as in the beginning of a relationship with your customer.

  • If the business/customer relationship doesn't work out, attempt to salvage whatever good and goodwill are still left in the relationship. Just because it didn't work out with them, doesn't mean they wouldn't refer others to you...as long as you treat them with respect.

  • Despite any differences of opinion, work hard to be honest and positive. Always be noble, respectful and genuine.

The message is simple: People understand that things go wrong. They understand that you forget. They understand that you get busy. They understand that you and your product or service may be imperfect. All they want is to feel like you respect them, you care about them, and that you'll do whatever it takes to help them.

If you've burned bridges in the past, it's not too late to start re-building them now.

Positive relationships are the key to success in business, and it starts with YOU, now.

Copyright 2001 By Craig Valine


Craig Valine is a Marketing Performance Coach Who Helps Independent Consultants, Coaches, and Service Professionals Get More Clients, Make More Money, and Have More Fun In Their Business. To subscribe to his "Marketing YOUniquely" eNewsletter, Go To www.craigvaline.com/subscribe.html 

 
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